Anonymous asked:

I don't know if you've answered this before, but do you prefer sub or dub?

Apologies for the late response!

I view most frequently with the dub, as I believe that past the first three episodes, it maintains a generally top-notch quality right until the end, and though I may get some flak for it, think Tiffany Grant poses the purest characterization of Asuka, even surpassing the (exemplary, to be sure) original.

Initially, watching the dub, I watched the first episode and a half, unimpressed by the voice over work; I thought Shinji sounded like an embarrassment of an awkward teen and Misato sounded obnoxious. Then I heard the line in which Misato wonders if she’s being overly perky with Shinji when he doesn’t seem to respond particularly open to it, and it made sense. Though some of this, in both tone and delivery, can be blamed on the fact that they were only voicing the dub in four episode intervals as they would come in, and not having the creator’s insight, what they managed to do when they figured the characters’ motivations (and therefore tone) out with further information, is nothing short of staggering. Watch the scene in which Misato listens to Kaji’s message or Asuka faces Arael (or any of that episode, really), and it will be very apparent how well done the work in the dub becomes.

Translation errors, however, are to be noted. Some of them are quite disappointing and large, happening at unfortunate moments. One integral moment, in which Kaworu is changed from remarking on music being one of humanity’s greatest cultural achievements to citing Ode to Joy as being so instead. This was, ironically, what I used for the intro to my TOUCH: An Ode to Evangelion video, though I edited it (for a good couple hours to make sure the audio was in sync with the video and overlaying the clips…) to get it closer to the original intention, narrowing it down to him citing singing and being humanity’s greatest cultural achievement; not quite there, but having something pertaining strongly to music rather than just one particular piece was imperative to the themes of the video.

I think as long as awareness of the important translation errors, is maintained, the dub does a relatively good job from a script perspective of conveying the story - the visuals, context, and performances do the rest. Translation is one place that I can find almost no fault in FUNimation’s english dub of the Rebuild of Evangelion films, as well as performance.

When researching the story and themes, I will listen to the dub and have subtitles on, noting any contradictory moments, and taking the subtitles as the final say in the matter. I listen to the dub at the same time so that I can both audibly and visually catch on to what I’m experiencing, which makes drawing parallels that much easier. It’s not a trick, just a cognitive reflex.

I will always default toward an english dub for many things, but really, whatever I experience first usually becomes the version I end up attached to; most recently being Kill la Kill, as there is not much legitimately wrong with the dub, but I’m fully accustomed and attached to the pitch and tone of the Japanese voices- even if I can’t understand most of it without reading a bar of text. After witnessing something for an extended period without an alternative, it will no doubt become the most easily processed and enjoyed form. Exceptionally, however, watching Evangelion 3.33 dubbed in the theater was an absolute treat for me, being the cast I’m most familiar with, filling in a film that I’m not familiar hearing them in. This seems likely as to why many anime fans scoff at the thought watching their anime dubbed, as it will all be bound to sound ‘off’ to them. That, or they just really don’t like their own language.

Asuka Langley Soryu - A Character Interlude
featuring 99 Luftballons by Nena

What are you, stupid?

Presented in original aspect ratios - 4:3 & 16:9

With the Rebuild of Evangelion films, already having their chronology listed as though they were production models and their varying versions, as well as introducing the combination of Units 08 and 02 (referred to directly in the film and marketing as Unit 08+02), it only seems oddly natural that FINAL/4.0 would follow suit in the naming scheme, inserting a theme the film itself seems to have created.
Zoom Info
With the Rebuild of Evangelion films, already having their chronology listed as though they were production models and their varying versions, as well as introducing the combination of Units 08 and 02 (referred to directly in the film and marketing as Unit 08+02), it only seems oddly natural that FINAL/4.0 would follow suit in the naming scheme, inserting a theme the film itself seems to have created.
Zoom Info

With the Rebuild of Evangelion films, already having their chronology listed as though they were production models and their varying versions, as well as introducing the combination of Units 08 and 02 (referred to directly in the film and marketing as Unit 08+02), it only seems oddly natural that FINAL/4.0 would follow suit in the naming scheme, inserting a theme the film itself seems to have created.

areiofhope asked:

Two questions: 1. What video editing software do you use? 2. Have you considered uploading your videos anywhere other than YouTube? They are fantastic and I would hate for them to be hit with copyright claims and forced to be taken down.

1. Sony Vegas Pro 12

2. First of all, thank you(!), and I’ve considered uploading to either Vimeo or DailyMotion as a backup plan; I make sure to register each video under creative commons so I can’t make any money off of them, which puts up a small wall (but a wall no less) between the video and a copyright claim.

Video Announcements - In Production and Beyond

I’m currently working on a ‘Theatrical Trailer’ for Neon Genesis Evangelion, as a sort of successor to the 'To Build a Home' Teaser Trailer, this time focusing more on the grand scale of Evangelion’s conflict, working more as a cinematic sizzle trailer. For this, I require some help: If anybody can find quotes of praise/endorsement from any reputable source or individual, be it a reviewer or industry commentator, please send me a message with the source and the quote, and I may be able to use it in the trailer! It’s highly likely that I’ll be doing this for Rebuild of Evangelion as well, depending on the reception of these.

I’m also currently in planning for a series of character-focused ‘Interludes’, which will be short, intimate, and custom-tailored videos looking at each of Evangelion’s main characters, set to a series of inspired musical choices. I’ll be releasing these in no particular order, and still debating whether to focus on just Neon Genesis Evangelion or Rebuild as well - either way, I’m sure they’ll be enjoyable to watch and edit!

Last, but not least, I’m announcing that I’ll be doing a successor to TOUCH: An Ode to Evangelion… after Evangelion 4.0: [FINAL] is released on Blu-Ray. It’s going to be focused mostly on the events of Final, and my musical choice is entirely based on my prediction of the tone and thematic content of the film as the final end to Evangelion. To my analysis of Rebuild and the series in general, going into my musical choice for a thematic representation of what I imagine the feeling coming out of 4.0 will be: don’t let me down.

image

Anonymous asked:

Love the blog, I've become a huge fan of the Rebuild movies over the summer and plan on watching the original series again relatively soon. My question is, what is the source for the background on this page? It's very pretty.

Thank you! I’ve been thinking I’m due for a rewatch of the series (by which I mean in narrative chronological order, Neon Genesis Evangelion, The End of Evangelion, Rebuild of Evangelion) as well.

Source of the image is from the 2014-15 Studio Khara Calendar.

I am a big fan of Japanese animation. They make movies [that] look at the darker themes and I am fascinated by what they do. I love animation. It allows me to be free to create a character that is totally different than me. And with the Japanese, every film pushes the envelope a little further.

Robin Williams (1951 - 2014)

An avid fan of Evangelion (as well as Ghost in the Shell, Cowboy Bebop, and Akira, among others), on the value of anime in the world of animation. A good guy, now he can fly. I’m not sure about having a silver sword that kills bad guys, nor being sixty feet tall, but a tremendous presence to be lost for sure. [x]

Personally, a long-time favorite actor of mine, giving mainstream credibility to anime. As somebody who has suffered from severe depression, and funneled into my work, I feel great sadness for the loss of a man who put on a face of happiness for his work, giving so much to the rest of the world, even when his heart was wrapped in sadness.

"This world is overflowing with with sorrow. Its people are drowning in emptiness and loneliness fills their hearts."

Rest in Peace - Your work and influence goes undying.